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20 apartments for rent near Washington Park, Seattle, WA

Ondine at Juanita Bay
Kirkland, WA 98034
$1,500 - $1,935
Studio - 2 Beds
Evolve Apartment Homes
Seattle, WA 98122
$1,480 - $3,658
1 - 2 Beds
Chandlers Bay
Kent, WA 98032
$1,138 - $1,726
1 - 3 Beds

Apartments in Washington Park, Seattle, WA

Evolve Apartment Homes
Seattle, WA 98122
$1,480 - $3,658
1 - 2 Beds
AVA Capitol Hill
Seattle, WA 98122
$1,477 - $3,850
Studio - 2 Beds
Stack House Apartments
Seattle, WA 98109
Call for rates
Studio - 3 Beds
AMLI South Lake Union
Seattle, WA 98109
$1,552 - $3,187
Studio - 2 Beds
Harbor Steps
Seattle, WA 98101
$1,732 - $4,592
Studio - 2 Beds
Vermont Inn
Seattle, WA 98121
$1,795 - $2,095
Studio
Short-Term
Viktoria
Seattle, WA 98101
$1,295 - $5,100
Studio - 2 Beds
The Mercer Luxury Apartment Homes
Mercer Island, WA 98040
Call for rates
Studio - 2 Beds
AMLI At Bellevue Park
Bellevue, WA 98004
$1,974 - $4,331
1 - 3 Beds
Aventine
Bellevue, WA 98004
$1,425 - $1,770
Studio - 2 Beds
Furnished Studio - 98004
Bellevue, WA 98004
From $3,111
1 Bed
Short-Term
Overlook at Magnolia
Seattle, WA 98199
$1,445 - $2,000
1 - 4 Beds
Magnolia's Best Kept Secret!
The Station At Othello Park
Seattle, WA 98118
Call for rates
Studio - 2 Beds
Life is Better Here!
4730 California
Seattle, WA 98116
$894 - $2,445
Studio - 2 Beds
At the center of Seattle's best kept secret!
Ondine at Juanita Bay
Kirkland, WA 98034
$1,500 - $1,935
Studio - 2 Beds
From $2,422
1 Bed
Short-Term
Willow Court Apartments
Seattle, WA 98106
$1,125 - $1,475
1 - 2 Beds
From $2,295
1 Bed
Short-Term
Colonial Square
Bellevue, WA 98007
$1,330 - $1,350
Studio - 2 Beds
From $3,060
1 Bed
Short-Term

Washington Park refers to both a park and neighborhood in east central Seattle, Washington. The park represents a cooperative ownership agreement between the city government and the University of Washington: The city owns all 230 acres of parkland, while the university owns all the trees and plants that grow on the land.

Development of the Washington Park area began in 1934 when the Olmstead Brothers, a local landscape firm specializing in urban, wild landscapes, started to create a “living plant museum,” an educational resource intended to serve university scientists and botany students. Due to the park’s public success, the taxonomic structure of its plantings became less ordered and more plentiful. In 1959, a Japanese Garden opened as a tourist attraction. In 1968, a trail was dug and boardwalks were laid to extend the public’s reach out to the marshy north end of the park. Today the park sprawls from Union Bay to Lake Washington and is considered one of the most beloved attractions in Seattle, drawing 360,000 visitors annually.

Not surprisingly, the limited amount of living space that surrounds Washington Park is some of the most sought after real estate in Seattle. The official Washington Park neighborhood, located to the southeast of the park, is known for its many Tudor-style houses, some of which (including the university president’s house) have been around longer than the park itself. East Madison Street and Lake Washington Boulevard East serve as the neighborhood’s main drags and are home to many well-reviewed restaurants, such as Nishino and Red Onion Tavern. The Evergreen Point Floating Bridge (State Route 220) is easily accessible from the neighborhood, making travel across Lake Washington a breeze. Due to the idyllic location and the upkeep costs associated with historic homes, Washington Park remains an affluent neighborhood within central Seattle, which is a fairly economically diverse area overall.